“Holmes, you are sometimes a most annoying creature”

-Barry Grant

 

In Barry Grant’s world, Sherlock goes to the countryside after hearing about a scientist who tortures apes in his lab, and for someone who’s a genius hacker known as Black Swann.It’s a place where the government, media practitioners, and even the police have made a deal to hack a private life of the citizens.

It’s a place where the government, media practitioners, and even the police have made a deal to hack a private life of the citizens.

How can he solve the crime if in every lead they tried to block it?

 

 

Confession:

Since I haven’t read the series of Sherlock Holmes, I cannot say that the way Barry wrote the novel is just similar to Conan Doyle’s, but I like how he put Holmes to the modern generation. Holmes personality is there (a bit), and especially his logical and smart way of getting an advantage from the antagonist.

Despite Holmes’ popularity, I am into Lestrade more than him. Lestrade seemed much more ordinary and human-like, while Holmes is too perfect.

The only thing that I was hoping is for more hints, but not giving away the answer yet. It’s like on his every turn for revealing the mystery, there will always be why. Why this? Why that? I like to put myself in that world and see if I could at least figure out what had happened, and what would happen next.

If only the words are not too hard to understand for children below 15-year-old, this is a good bedtime story for them. Different, but engaging for kids because of the detective role.

It’s an easy read due to its number of pages, the characters are developed, and the flow is not confusing, unlike the other mystery books I’ve read.

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